Client Side Technologies

Client: A desktop computer or workstation that is capable of obtaining information and applications from a server.

HTML: Hypertext Markup Language, a standardized system for tagging text files to achieve font, colour, graphics, and hyperlink effects on World Wide Web pages.

CSS: A cascading style sheet (CSS) is a Web page derived from multiple sources with a defined order of precedence where the definitions of any style element conflict.

Bootstrap: A technique of loading a program into a computer by means of a few initial instructions which enable the introduction of the rest of the program from an input device.

Javascript: An object-oriented computer programming language commonly used to create interactive effects within web browsers.

Query: A query is a request for data or information from a database table or combination of tables. This data may be generated as results returned by Structured Query Language (SQL) or as pictorials, graphs or complex results, e.g., trend analyses from data-mining tools.

AJAX: The method of exchanging data with a server, and updating parts of a web page – without reloading the entire page.

Angular: Is a structural framework for dynamic web apps. It lets you use HTML as your template language and lets you extend HTML’s syntax to express your application’s components clearly and succinctly. AngularJS’s data binding and dependency injection eliminate much of the code you would otherwise have to write.

Cookies: A small text file (up to 4KB) created by a website that is stored in the user’s computer either temporarily for that session only or permanently on the hard disk (persistent cookie). Cookies provide a way for the website to recognize you and keep track of your preferences.

Protocol: a set of guidelines for implementing networking communications between computers. Among the most important sets of the Internet protocols are TCP/IP, HTTPS, SMTP, and DNS.

FTP: The File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is the standard network protocol used for the transfer of computer files between a client and server on a computer network. FTP is built on a client-server model architecture and uses separate control and data connections between the client and the server.

CMS: A content management system (CMS) is a computer application that supports the creation and modification of digital content. It typically supports multiple users in a collaborative environment.

Web-Server: Web servers are computers that deliver (serves up) Web pages. Every Web server has an IP address and possibly a domain name. For example, if you enter the URL http://www.webopedia.com/index.html in your browser, this sends a request to the Web server whose domain name is webopedia.com.

Database: A database management system (DBMS) is a computer software application that interacts with end-users, other applications, and the database itself to capture and analyze data. A general-purpose DBMS allows the definition, creation, querying, update, and administration of databases.

PHP: A scripting language that is widely used to create dynamic Web pages. Combining syntax from the C, Java and Perl languages, PHP code is embedded within HTML pages for server-side execution.

SQL:  Structured Query Language (SQL) is a standard computer language for relational database management and data manipulation. SQL is used to query, insert, update and modify data.

mySQL: MySQL is an open source relational database management system (RDBMS) based on Structured Query Language (SQL). … LAMP is a Web development platform that uses Linux as the operating system, Apache as the Web server, MySQL as the relational database management system and PHP as the object-oriented scripting language.

ASP.net: ASP.NET is a set of Web development tools offered by Microsoft. Programs like Visual Studio .NET and Visual Web Developer allow Web developers to create dynamic websites using a visual interface. … ASP.NET is built on the.NETframework, which provides an application program interface (API) for software programmers.

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